Selling car back to dealership

selling car back to dealership

Marco was looking for a new car, we found a super good deal on one so we jumped on it right away, and it just went downhill from there. Auber Gauges .

I am available to help you start your dealers lot. I will train at no expense for revenue sharing. No upfront fee!

A must watch educational video for the used car buyer.

There's a sales crisis in the European auto industry. The pressure is on, and the prices for used cars, too, are falling. Used cars that are traded in on new ones .

http://www.cadillacnorwood.com/ Chris Fousek of Cadillac Village of Norwood talks about 10 tips for buying a used car from a dealership.

There might be some car dealers that would try to cover up a car's faults. But Journee Autos of Largo, Florida took the opposite route when they were looking to .

Everyone has a story to tell, but most never tell it -- until now. This is one man's confession.Meet Philip Reed, a senior editor for Edmunds.com. He worked .

small business ideas second hand cars 2nd hand cars buy car new cars how start used car business in india hindi tips if you want to start second hand car .

Looking for the ultimate car buying guide? This probably isn't it. This is just our opinion about the best used car you can buy and how much you should pay for it.

What should you check for when buying a second hand car. Top Gear presenter Steve Berry shows you how to buy a used car safely and avoid scratches, .

Learn how to call the owner of a used car, figure out what the car is worth, run a free VIN number check, and many other tips and tricks. If you see a used car for .

Some steps on what you can do to Start your own car biz.


selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

BBC News Online investigates what it means for Europe's car buyers.

What are the key changes?

Dealers will be allowed to sell cars of more than one marque in the same showroom.

So a single shopping trip to one dealership could replace three separate visits to showrooms to chose between, say, that Saab, BMW or Audi.

And, when trouble strikes, you will be able to go to a wider range of authorised repair outfits rather than being forced to trek back to the branded showroom.

But dealers will no longer be obliged to provide repair services.

That sounds more convenient. But will cars get cheaper?

Yes, in theory. More outlets selling a wider variety of cars means more competition.

And the European Commission thinks that should bring car prices down.

It will also make it far easier to set up car supermarkets, again increasing competition.

Consumer groups have been lobbying for years against the privileged position of the car makers who control outlets, and thus prices.

That sounds even better. So why are the changes controversial?

The changes divert considerable control from car manufacturers to dealers.

Car makers argue that their profits will be squeezed unfairly.

And they say that the rise of car supermarkets would kill off smaller dealerships, in a move that will actually harm consumers.

They also say that having a wider range of companies offering repair services and using different parts will reduce the standards of repairs.

Politicians in countries with burgeoning car industries have also expressed concern about the impact of the changes.

German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder has been particularly vocal, keen to defend the country's manufacturing sector ahead of September's general election.

When will the changes come into effect?

From October onwards, all dealers must choose whether to be selective or exclusive.

Car makers then have a year's grace to comply, and start supplying new outlets.

But one key liberalisation has been delayed at the last minute.

The introduction of controversial measures giving dealers the right to open showrooms anywhere in the 15-nation European Union, from Aberdeen to Athens, has been put back a year to October 2005.

That means the disparity between car prices in different countries may not equal out just yet.


It's decision time for Smart dealerships

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The Smart Electric Drive hit the ground in 2007 as a modified version of a standard Smart Fortwo city car. But the first generation wasn’t something just anyone could go out and buy –- it .

Pricing and update information for the 2017 Smart Fortwo electric drive coupe and cabrio is finally out. The coupe will start at $24,550, the cabrio at $28,750. Both prices are before any .

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership

Selling car back to dealership Selling car back to dealership

This is the 2017 Smart fortwo electric drive

Smart’s latest EV, the 2017 fortwo electric drive, makes its world debut at the 2016 Paris motor show and goes on sale here next spring, with the convertible coming in summer. Smart boss Annette .


Do dealerships make more off new or used cars?

Selling car back to dealership

Generally, dealerships make the most money selling used cars. In a nutshell, there is a lot more variation among used cars than among new cars, making it harder for buyers to comparison shop and easier for dealerships to hide profit.

Contrary to popular belief, the profit margin on most new cars is quite small. Dealerships typically make more money selling more expensive cars, such as SUVs and luxury cars, but high-volume models are strategically priced to compete with other makes and models, as well as with rival dealerships. The Internet has helped car shoppers make sense of industry terminology like "dealer invoice," which is what the dealership pays the manufacturer for the car. There are also laws that regulate which information must be shown to the customer — hence the ubiquitous window sticker. The math that went into new car pricing used to be pretty secretive, but now it's all out in the open, and a well-educated shopper has a good sense of how much the dealer stands to profit from a sale and a strong position for negotiating [source: Popular Mechanics].

Used cars, however, are a different ballgame, because they're not acquired or sold on an even playing field. Depreciation varies by year, model and region, and a dealership is under no obligation to disclose how much it paid for the car. As such, used car guides, such as Kelley Blue Book and NADA Guides, can provide guidelines for reasonable trade-in, wholesale and retail pricing, but they're not to be taken as gospel. As long as the car looks like it's in good condition and the price seems fair compared to similar vehicles on the market, the customer is usually none the wiser. Dealerships tend to get these used cars cheap, too, by picking them up at auction or by lowball trade-in offers to customers eager to get into new cars.

Though there is more profit baked into used car pricing, dealers still make money by selling new cars. Many customers take their new cars back to dealerships for service, a loss leader while the car is under warranty but profitable in later years [source: Henry].

The finance department is another opportunity for the dealer to score. Once the price of the car has been negotiated, the person at the finance desk starts his or her own set of sales pitches. Some dealerships urge customers to buy extended warranties or add other services to the car purchase. They've also been known to qualify the customer for a loan at one rate and then quote the customer a slightly higher rate, pocketing the difference [source: Weathers]. It's fair for a car dealership to make a profit. But some techniques, though legal, are still shady, and it's still up to the customer to be vigilant.


17 Things Car Salesmen Don't Want You to Know

Selling car back to dealership

Regular readers of the content aggregator Reddit.com may have seen a post recently asking car salesmen to confess their greatest fears.

The response was overwhelming; over 7,500 comments were posted. As I read through the list (it took hours!) I jotted down some recurring themes. From those notes I have identified car salesmen's 17 greatest fears and weaknesses. (See also: Guide to Buying a Used Car Without Going Crazy)

If you're in the market for a new or used car anytime soon, this list could save you a lot of money. (By the way, I use "salesman9quot; and "salesmen9quot; but this obviously refers to both men and women in the auto sales force.)

1. Your Smartphone Is Your Most Powerful Weapon

Years ago, car dealerships and their sales force held all the cards, and buyers held very few. But that has changed completely. Now, with information and sites like Edmunds.com's True Market Value (TMV), Autotrader, eBay Motors, and access to car experts in the palm of your hand, you have effectively marginalized the car salesman. You know what they paid for the car, what their mark up is, when they bought it, what their bottom line is, everything. You can, in essence, make haggling a thing of the past. However, if you leave your phone at home, then you better have a terrific memory and be able stick by your guns. Proof is power.

2. You Can Win the Game Before Setting Foot on a Lot

The Internet has done wonders for the humble consumer. With it, you can email 20 dealers within a 50 mile radius, tell them what you're looking for, and ask them to send you back a quote. From those quotes, pick the lowest couple and take those to any dealership you want. They'll usually be forced to match it, destroying whatever profit margin they were hoping for. And before you feel too bad, the dealerships get massive bonuses by hitting certain sales targets. They can give you the car at cost and still walk away with a nice pile of cash.

3. Be Wary of Salesmen Who Leave to Let You "Talk it Over"

I actually had this happen to a friend of mine, and I laughed when I saw it come up in the comments.

If you somehow manage to get stuck in the salesman's office haggling over numbers, he may receive a call and leave to let you and your partner "talk it over." This is an old trick that some dealers use to listen in on your conversation, letting them know instantly just what your bottom line is. If it happens, whispers or text messages to each other may be a good way to combat eaves dropping.

4. You Are Being Screwed on Your Trade In

If the car you're trading in is in good condition, you won't be getting a good deal on it.

Sure, you're armed with the Kelley Blue Book (KBB) trade-in price and resale price, but those numbers are hogwash. Dealers use something called the National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) database, which gives them a much more realistic idea of what they can get for your trade. Some of the salesmen reported KBB values that undervalued cars by $5,000 or more. Your best bet is to get a copy of the NADA value for your car. Or, if you can, sell it privately instead.

5. There Are Mark-Ups Aplenty on the Sales Stickers

Dealerships refer to them as "bumper stickers" because that's where they bump up the price of the car. Little extras like VIN etching, fabric protectants, sealants, and other "must have" additions can all be done by you at home, usually for way less. Ask to see the original invoice, and compare it to the bumper sticker. That's what you really want to look at. If they refuse, go elsewhere. And even then, the invoice doesn't tell the whole story. See fear number 10, below.

6. You Have the Power to Control the Sale

Those two things below your waist, called legs, are a sales weapon.

If at any time you don't feel good about the sale, you can walk away. Often, the salesman will hit you with a much lower offer when you get up out of your seat and tell them you've decided against it. Remember, they can't do the deal without you, and you are always in a position to say, "NO.9quot; You lose nothing but a few hours of your time; they lose a commission and a bonus.

7. The Dealership's Extended Warranties Are for Suckers

Even if you get the salesman to agree to a price that is basically what the dealership paid for the car, you still have to go to that back room; the room where the deal is sealed.

Whether you lease, finance it, or plonk down a wad of cash, they'll try to push every single option they can on you. That includes an extended warranty that you can buy way cheaper from someone else. The dealership makes a lot of money on these service contracts. Don't fall for this. As one of the salesmen pointed out, the finance manager is actually a salesman, too. They're going to do whatever they can to squeeze more money out of you before you leave.

8. The Four Square Is Designed to Manipulate You

There have been many, many negative articles written on the four square worksheet, and with good reason.

The four square sheet is a way for the salesman to "play9quot; with the numbers and make you think you're getting a great deal. Usually, the first time they come to the table with it, the numbers are so insulting you'll want to walk out. That's intentional. They can't look like miracle workers if they give you a reasonable price. And then the numbers game is played out, but the price of the car rarely goes down more than a few bucks. However, there's a better way to show just how this is used to trap you into a price you really don't want to pay. Read this article, written by car salesmen FOR car salesmen. It's quite an eye opener. And as one redditor advised, tell them not to bring out the four square worksheet or you're leaving. That puts you in a position of power, and they'll know you're no sucker.

9. Salesmen Have Ways to Mess With Your Head

You drive into a dealership with your trade in. The salesman looks it over, nodding, giving the usual chit chat. But he'll ask things like "does it have power steering?" or "does it have a sunroof?" He already knows the answer. He knows the spec of the car and what it's worth. He just wants you to say NO a lot. And by saying no over and over, you start to devalue your trade in, and expect less for it. Get the NADA value, and whatever he asks you, just keep that number in your head.

Another method is taking the keys from your trade in before you sit down at the negotiation table. It's a lot harder to walk away when you don't have your keys on you. They know this, and will often give the keys to a third party, like their sales manager. Now, they have to hunt him down before you can get your keys, and that will take a while. Long enough for them to have another crack at you.

10. Never Offer to Pay Invoice for Your Vehicle

You hear people say it all the time. "I'm paying invoice for that car, not a cent more." Well, go ahead, it's better than paying the MSRP. But very few people will pay MSRP anyway. And the invoice price of the car is not telling you the whole story. The dealership gets dealer holdbacks, customer rebates, and factory-to-dealer incentives. This is money they can take off the sales price and offer to you, but they won't just hand it over without a fight. These incentives are usually not even advertised, but they can save you thousands.

11. Never Talk About Your Down Payment Up Front

The salesman will ask early on "how much are you going to put down?" It seems like a reasonable question, but you're giving up a bargaining chip way too early. One story talks about an old man who had $10,000 to put down on a truck, and the dealership basically upped the price of the truck to offset that down payment. In effect, the old man threw it away. Wait until you know the "Out the Door" price of the vehicle before you talk about a down payment.

12. Monthly Payments Are Deceptive

You should have a figure in your head of what you can afford to pay for the car, NOT for the monthly payment. The reason is simple. A dealership can mess with the figures, the length of the loan, and the APR, and reduce your monthly payment, but you could end up paying even more for the car than you first agreed to. Look at the final cost, and only the final cost. If your monthly price for that is too high, you're spending more than you want to.

13. Hail-Damaged "Bargains9quot; Are Marked Way Too High

If the cars at the dealership get hail damage, they're going to mark them down and sell them to you at a discount. Great, a bargain, if you don't mind the dents. But the dealership has insurance policies on the cars on the lot, and they've already been reimbursed for that damage. The dealership is not passing all of that on to you, so you're generating some nice profit for them.

14. Non-Factory After-Market Options Are a Huge Rip Off

Many dealers will add "extras9quot; to the car that cost them pennies on the dollar. Pin striping, rims, spoilers, stereo systems, alarms, you name it, they'll throw it in.

Negotiate from the invoice price, not the padded sticker price. You don't need to pay $250 for a few bucks worth of pin striping. You don't need floor mats that cost $200. If it's non-factory, ask for it to be taken off. All of it. Do it yourself, or get a trusted mechanic to do it. And you can also get your tinting and clear bras done elsewhere for around HALF the price the dealership will charge.

15. You Get the Best Deal From the Internet Salesman

This was the one point that kept coming up over and over.

When you go through the Internet sales department, the dealership already knows that you know certain things. They know you're a savvy shopper, that you're looking around, and that you're comparing prices. The Internet salesman will start at a much lower price than the salesman on the lot. In short — don't walk onto the lot unless you're going in to meet the salesman you've been dealing with online.

16. Get Your Own Financing Before You Buy

You can negotiate way better terms in advance, with a credit union or another financial institution. Don't leave it up to the dealership; get this all pre-approved before you walk in.

17. You Can Cancel Those Service Contracts Within 30 Days

So you get caught up in the financial meltdown and agree to pay for a lot of extras, including the extended warranty, tire protection, and so on. Well, you are not stuck with them. You can cancel within 30 days and get your money back. You can also use this to your advantage. Agree to the service contracts if you get money taken off the price of the car. The dealership makes way more from the service plans than the car anyway, so they'll be happy to make the deal. When you cancel, you're in the money.

There were many more tips in the reddit.com thread, which I urge you to read. And remember, these all came from people who make a living selling cars. This is straight from the source, and well worth remembering.

Are you a car salesman with more information to share? Let us know in comments below.

Selling car back to dealership

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Selling car back to dealership

It's a shame that you have to be middle-aged before you get to be an expert on buying cars. Salesmen don't mess with me anywhere near as much as they did 20-30 years ago, and I'm sure it has more to do with the lines on my face and general lack of hair on top of my head more than a general reform of automobile sales practices. Meanwhile, this should be required reading for anyone under, uh, 40 who is about to go through the ordeal of buying a new car.

In particular, I usually do #2 before setting forth. I found a really good deal on my current car that way and brought printouts just in case.

We have a special way of dealing with #3. Do all your conferencing in some language other than English. German works for us, and my German is sufficiently bad (and my wife's English sufficiently flawless) to give the salesman the clear impression that we're not doing it because we just came off the boat yesterday.

The best way to avoid situation #4 and #9 is to only bring in trades that are barely running. If the car is a jalopy to begin with, there isn't very much the salesman can do to knock you down from the $500 it's probably worth. In fact, you usually get offered more than that $500 in the hopes that it will make you so happy you'll not notice the other ways you're being hosed.

As for #5, #7, #14, imagine you're two years old. What's the easiest word that comes out of your mouth (other than "mine")? It's "no." Say it often, and with authority. I usually say, "I just want the car. That's it." Do that, and you'll never have to do #17. Note this also applies to tires and large appliances.

#16 is a given. The credit union is right next door to the car dealers. First I get my loan pre-approved, then I go shopping. That also takes care of #8, #11, and #12.

Selling car back to dealership

No it is not the fact that you are old. It's the fact that we actually care.

Back in the day any salesperson did not care quite at all if the customer was satisfied, they just box pushed the easiest purchase and torqued the customer until they bought. This is not the case now a days, if any dealer is worth your time and money they will listen to what you are asking for, be fair about things and take of you like family.

Anyone who tells you, you are getting "screwed on your trade" is purely not true. The vehicle may have dings and dents, that the client has forgotten about. Or it has rust or mechanical trouble or other problems. Cars are depreciating assets and every day they are on the road they lose their value. No vehicle will appreciate unless you are driving something vintage. If you drive a common sedan you will get common money for it, it is that simple.

There is not much money in a vehicle. We charge a certain price for our products because we install them professionally, the fact the author of this article wrote that "VIN Etching" can be done at home makes me cringe because a certified technician from for example "Sherlock" has to do it. We do things a certain way because that is how the manufacturer requests it to be done and if for example ruin something on the car doing an installation of something, we have to pay to fix it. We also guarantee every product we sell you, there is the value in having it done through us.

If the salesperson is being transparent with you, don't think they are playing you. Most salespeople these days are transparent, like myself. Integrity and honesty are the name of the game, if you don't take pride in what you do no one will come back to buy from you again and there you go, short term sales long term nothing.

As for warranties being for "suckers" yeah that can't be farther from the truth. That is like saying insurance is for suckers. Down the line after the manufacturer warranty has run out you will thanking your lucky stars for the extended warranty. I see many clients that come and say the reason they want a new car is because they DONE putting money on repairs. The extended warranty may seem like a lot up front, but in the long run when the car lasts you eight years being fully warrantied and you not having to drop a cent on maintenance but brakes, tires and windshield wiper blades, your pocket will be happy and you will be much happier. You can stretch the longevity of your vehicles life with a single warranty. Drive the car longer, get better bang for your buck and spend less money in long term.

As for the "four square" the reason why we use it is because the majority of people who sit down with their significant other or their friend use this method. It allows us to show different options of purchase or lease. We do not manipulate the figures, legitimate salespeople are in this for the long-run. Manipulating a client only creates negative feelings towards the salesperson and the dealership. This again does not create return clients which is how we make our money. If you give a good service and make the client understand what we are talking about and both parties feel good about the transaction then we did our job. It's all about the clients, no happy clients, not a very productive and long career.

As for us "playing with your head" and asking random questions about the value and options on a car. We do not know until the car is evaluated. We ask you these questions to make the evaluators life easier so we can get the evaluation done promptly so you do not have the spend hours in the dealership. Your time is valuable and we take that seriously. Also if we do not investigate your wants and needs properly you probably won't be interested in the vehicle that we will show you. By asking for your vehicle options, we can get a basis as to what you are used to driving and we can then discuss if you would like something equally equipped, less equiped or more equipped. We don't play with our client's heads, that just leads no where.

If you are paying invoice there is a reason for it. Cars in high demand will not be sold for a deal, it's like a Tesla, they do not negotiate. If the salesmen asks you early on how much you want to put down, they are not interested in finding a vehicle that will build value for you. They just want to go straight ahead to payment so they do not have to actually do their job.

The dealer has to be able to come up with the reason why the payment is that high. The dealer can't just put the monthly whatever they want and expect the client to just pay it. That is not good business practice and here in Canada actually incredibly illegal. If you buy accesories of course your price will cost more, otherwise its the taxes, borrowing cost, msrp, dealer fees for vehicle preparation and any applicable rebates that create your monthly payment.

At my dealership, if a car is hail damaged we don't even try to sell it. it just get's brought to auction. In fact we don't get reimbursed because every vehicle has a certain deductible and if the insurance pays for the damages we are obliged to fix it. Most dealerships do not pay the deductible for the insurance because it's usually above 5000$. Then just increases with every claim so it is not intelligent to do it that way. Most dealers actually take a massive hit for a damaged vehicle because they usually get sold at auction for a much much cheaper price and the dealer loses loads of money.

You do not get the best deal from the internet salesmen. Low price maybe, but value no definitely not. The internet salesmen usually does not qualify the client. He does not assess their needs. If for example you tow on a daily basis (because you are in landscaping) 8000LBS. Currently you are looking at a light duty pick up truck, and the internet salesperson does not know this. You agree on price, meet up and buy the truck and then you realize that you miscalculated the amount the truck which now is 7000LBS. This might not seem like much, but down the line you will hurt the truck and then have to either buy a new one, strengthen it or keep fixing it. A true salesmen has his customer's best intentions at heart. Be wary of those who only talk price those ones are the true sharks in the water because they actually do not care about you.

Non-factory aftermarket parts are not added unless the customer asks for them. No one these days does that unless they want to get stuck with a modified vehicle. Not one dealer where I am from modifies any vehicle unless it is pickup trucks and that does not happen that often either. Modifications occur only if the client asks for it.

Getting your own financing can be a good idea if the interest rates are higher than normal. Majority of places have their interest rates floating around 0%-2.99%. Getting a line of credit for example will get you an interest rate of around 2.4-2.8%. If you buy a vehicle that is above 2.8% it's understandable but dealerships usually offer better rates than the banks because now almost everyone has their own financial institutions that allow for way better interest rates than the average consumer can get through their financial institution of choice. Reason being: dealers deal in volume, so they have the best ways to negotiate with the banks for the best interest rates out there.

You can cancel the contract, but all of my clients don't because I actually take care of them. If a salesperson is honest with you their is no reason to cancel, it has to make sense for all parties and that's why I am doing well where I am.

We are not the scum of the earth trying to squeeze every dollar our of clients. We are honest individuals trying to make a living, just like you. Cut us some slack and I promise that you will get a good deal and above all the right vehicle to fit what your wants and needs are. Listen intently and let the salesperson go through the motions with you. They do this because they care and want to make sure that the vehicle you end up driving will serve you well for the years to come.

Selling car back to dealership

No it is not the fact that you are old. It's the fact that we actually care.

Back in the day any salesperson did not care quite at all if the customer was satisfied, they just box pushed the easiest purchase and torqued the customer until they bought. This is not the case now a days, if any dealer is worth your time and money they will listen to what you are asking for, be fair about things and take of you like family.

Anyone who tells you, you are getting "screwed on your trade" is purely not true. The vehicle may have dings and dents, that the client has forgotten about. Or it has rust or mechanical trouble or other problems. Cars are depreciating assets and every day they are on the road they lose their value. No vehicle will appreciate unless you are driving something vintage. If you drive a common sedan you will get common money for it, it is that simple.

There is not much money in a vehicle. We charge a certain price for our products because we install them professionally, the fact the author of this article wrote that "VIN Etching" can be done at home makes me cringe because a certified technician from for example "Sherlock" has to do it. We do things a certain way because that is how the manufacturer requests it to be done and if for example ruin something on the car doing an installation of something, we have to pay to fix it. We also guarantee every product we sell you, there is the value in having it done through us.

If the salesperson is being transparent with you, don't think they are playing you. Most salespeople these days are transparent, like myself. Integrity and honesty are the name of the game, if you don't take pride in what you do no one will come back to buy from you again and there you go, short term sales long term nothing.

As for warranties being for "suckers" yeah that can't be farther from the truth. That is like saying insurance is for suckers. Down the line after the manufacturer warranty has run out you will thanking your lucky stars for the extended warranty. I see many clients that come and say the reason they want a new car is because they DONE putting money on repairs. The extended warranty may seem like a lot up front, but in the long run when the car lasts you eight years being fully warrantied and you not having to drop a cent on maintenance but brakes, tires and windshield wiper blades, your pocket will be happy and you will be much happier. You can stretch the longevity of your vehicles life with a single warranty. Drive the car longer, get better bang for your buck and spend less money in long term.

As for the "four square" the reason why we use it is because the majority of people who sit down with their significant other or their friend use this method. It allows us to show different options of purchase or lease. We do not manipulate the figures, legitimate salespeople are in this for the long-run. Manipulating a client only creates negative feelings towards the salesperson and the dealership. This again does not create return clients which is how we make our money. If you give a good service and make the client understand what we are talking about and both parties feel good about the transaction then we did our job. It's all about the clients, no happy clients, not a very productive and long career.

As for us "playing with your head" and asking random questions about the value and options on a car. We do not know until the car is evaluated. We ask you these questions to make the evaluators life easier so we can get the evaluation done promptly so you do not have the spend hours in the dealership. Your time is valuable and we take that seriously. Also if we do not investigate your wants and needs properly you probably won't be interested in the vehicle that we will show you. By asking for your vehicle options, we can get a basis as to what you are used to driving and we can then discuss if you would like something equally equipped, less equiped or more equipped. We don't play with our client's heads, that just leads no where.

If you are paying invoice there is a reason for it. Cars in high demand will not be sold for a deal, it's like a Tesla, they do not negotiate. If the salesmen asks you early on how much you want to put down, they are not interested in finding a vehicle that will build value for you. They just want to go straight ahead to payment so they do not have to actually do their job.

The dealer has to be able to come up with the reason why the payment is that high. The dealer can't just put the monthly whatever they want and expect the client to just pay it. That is not good business practice and here in Canada actually incredibly illegal. If you buy accesories of course your price will cost more, otherwise its the taxes, borrowing cost, msrp, dealer fees for vehicle preparation and any applicable rebates that create your monthly payment.

At my dealership, if a car is hail damaged we don't even try to sell it. it just get's brought to auction. In fact we don't get reimbursed because every vehicle has a certain deductible and if the insurance pays for the damages we are obliged to fix it. Most dealerships do not pay the deductible for the insurance because it's usually above 5000$. Then just increases with every claim so it is not intelligent to do it that way. Most dealers actually take a massive hit for a damaged vehicle because they usually get sold at auction for a much much cheaper price and the dealer loses loads of money.

You do not get the best deal from the internet salesmen. Low price maybe, but value no definitely not. The internet salesmen usually does not qualify the client. He does not assess their needs. If for example you tow on a daily basis (because you are in landscaping) 8000LBS. Currently you are looking at a light duty pick up truck, and the internet salesperson does not know this. You agree on price, meet up and buy the truck and then you realize that you miscalculated the amount the truck which now is 7000LBS. This might not seem like much, but down the line you will hurt the truck and then have to either buy a new one, strengthen it or keep fixing it. A true salesmen has his customer's best intentions at heart. Be wary of those who only talk price those ones are the true sharks in the water because they actually do not care about you.

Non-factory aftermarket parts are not added unless the customer asks for them. No one these days does that unless they want to get stuck with a modified vehicle. Not one dealer where I am from modifies any vehicle unless it is pickup trucks and that does not happen that often either. Modifications occur only if the client asks for it.

Getting your own financing can be a good idea if the interest rates are higher than normal. Majority of places have their interest rates floating around 0%-2.99%. Getting a line of credit for example will get you an interest rate of around 2.4-2.8%. If you buy a vehicle that is above 2.8% it's understandable but dealerships usually offer better rates than the banks because now almost everyone has their own financial institutions that allow for way better interest rates than the average consumer can get through their financial institution of choice. Reason being: dealers deal in volume, so they have the best ways to negotiate with the banks for the best interest rates out there.

You can cancel the contract, but all of my clients don't because I actually take care of them. If a salesperson is honest with you their is no reason to cancel, it has to make sense for all parties and that's why I am doing well where I am.

We are not the scum of the earth trying to squeeze every dollar our of clients. We are honest individuals trying to make a living, just like you. Cut us some slack and I promise that you will get a good deal and above all the right vehicle to fit what your wants and needs are. Listen intently and let the salesperson go through the motions with you. They do this because they care and want to make sure that the vehicle you end up driving will serve you well for the years to come.